Former Call of Duty and Destiny developer Jason West has reportedly released new evidence to the blog TechCrunch that he believes implicates Activision Blizzard in a company-wide conspiracy to pad game development costs.

Many of you are probably aware that a class action lawsuit was filed against Activision Blizzard for allegedly using its own internal data to manipulate player performance. The lawsuit alleges that the gaming company used analytics tools to take action against its employees who were born in 1987 or later. It also claims that these tools were also used to manipulate the performance of the firm’s less-experienced workers.

Former CEO of the world’s largest video game publisher, Activision Blizzard, Bobby Kotick, was hit with a lawsuit over the weekend. The case, which was filed by an ex-employee of the company, accuses Kotick of being the ringleader of a hostile and vindictive corporate culture in the company, which was supposedly led by Kotick as CEO.

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A slew of allegations against Activision Blizzard employees have surfaced in the last week. They emerge as a result of a lawsuit brought against the business by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

After a two-year investigation, the state agency filed the complaint, alleging a history and culture of discrimination and harassment against women at the business, ranging from compensation and employment to accusations of a “pervasive frat boy workplace culture.”

A female employee committed herself while on a work vacation with a male supervisor with whom she was having a sexual connection, and nude pictures of her were allegedly shared around at a company party, according to the accusations against Activision Blizzard.

The lawsuit’s statement and contents are a shock given Activision Blizzard’s public position on discrimination over the years, since the business has been vocal about its inclusivity.

From the outside looking in, it seems that a rush of emails concerning the accusations has been flowing around the business. Vice president of corporate affairs Frances Townsend claimed they were “a distorted and untrue picture of our company, including factually incorrect, old, and out of context stories — some from more than a decade ago” in an email (which appeared in the Bloomberg article that broke the original story).

This isn’t the only piece of information we have about what’s going on at Activision Blizzard; more than 2,000 of the company’s 10,000 workers signed an open letter demanding more inclusive and transparent practices.

The demands in the letter were for the company to acknowledge and issue official statements about the allegations, for Frances Towsend to resign as Executive Sponsor of the ABK Employee Women’s Network, and for executive leadership to collaborate with employees to create an environment where employees feel safe to speak up.

Following the letter, Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick issued a statement acknowledging that the firm’s first reactions to the accusations were “tone-deaf,” and outlined five urgent measures the company will take. Employee assistance, listening sessions, staff adjustments, more compliance resources for recruiting procedures, and modifications to their games that were considered inappropriate were some of the items on the list.

Over 350 workers staged a walkout on Wednesday, July 28 to protest Activision Blizzard’s reaction to the discrimination and sexual harassment complaint. The day before, the business sent out an email guaranteeing compensation to anyone who participated in the walkout, which lasted from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. PDT.

With the walkout came an additional set of four demands entailing an end to mandatory arbitration clauses in employee contracts, the publication of compensation data to aid in deducing fair pay, an overhaul of the company’s hiring and promotion policies through an internal Diversity, Equity & Inclusion organization, and a third party to audit the company’s HR department, reporting structure, and executive staff.

The lawsuit’s micro-aspects are more damaging than what is revealed in the court papers. Multiple cases of persistent harassment have come to light since the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing filed its complaint and Bloomberg reported on it, and the number of victims and abusers continues rising.

Meanwhile, work on Blizzard’s flagship game World of Warcraft has come to a stop, and developer Alex Klontzas has indicated that the next patch may be postponed. Activision Blizzard has also recruited a law company that specializes in breaking up unions, which it has done with remarkable success in the case of Amazon, the world’s largest retailer.

This story is still unfolding. 

The story in question is the ongoing lawsuit brought by a group of former employees at Activision Blizzard regarding the former CEO’s alleged mismanagement of the company. The story in question involves a corporation that has been portrayed to the media as a pro-worker and pro-small business company, as opposed to a company that is primarily focused on stock price, which has been the consistent practice of Activision Blizzard as of late.. Read more about activision blizzard lawsuit document pdf and let us know what you think.

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