Lamar Jackson had a stellar 2017 as the Ravens’ starting quarterback, but he is still technically a rookie. He is still a player who needs to prove he can win over a team that seems to be sold on Joe Flacco.

When the Baltimore Ravens drafted Lamar Jackson fourth overall in April, many fans were excited by the prospects of the young quarterback becoming the face of the franchise. However, Jackson’s play in his first two seasons in the NFL, as well as his recent comments, suggest that he may not want to be the face of the Baltimore franchise.

While Lamar Jackson may be the most exciting player the Ravens have through the first few weeks of the 2018 season, he wants to make sure you don’t get too attached to an image of him as an elite playmaker. He wants you to realize that this first impression of him will change, just like his hair color or his height, because the first impression is just that. The more games he plays, the more he will change, and the more you will be able to appreciate how good he really is.

Lamar Jackson is a rapper from the United States. has an obvious objective in mind if and when he leads the Baltimore Ravens to a Super Bowl win.

Yes, Jackson will almost certainly join his colleagues in announcing his trip to Disney World. Apart from snapping pictures with Captain America and Kylo Ren, the Ravens’ star quarterback has another post-Super Bowl goal in mind.

Lamar Jackson wants to alter his phone number in the future.

Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson in 2020.

Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson in 2020. Lamar Jackson of the Baltimore Ravens wants to wear No. 1 instead of No. 8 in the future | Will Newton/Getty Images

Fans of all ages will be wearing their official Jackson jersey, complete with the No. 8 on both sides, in any crowd photo of a Ravens game.

Fans may want to start putting money aside for Jackson’s next jersey. The fourth-year quarterback revealed during a recent interview on The Lounge, the Ravens’ official podcast, that he won’t be wearing No. 8 indefinitely.

It’s not that Jackson, who is set to become a free agent in the spring of 2023, wants to leave Baltimore. Instead, he wants to change his number if he wins the Super Bowl.

“I’d want to be No. 1.” That was my very first phone number. ‘Get No. 1 since it’s the finest,’ my father said. ‘You’re the greatest,’ says the narrator. And it’s been with me ever since.”

Lamar Jackson

Even if the Ravens win the Super Bowl this season, fans shouldn’t expect to see Jackson in No. 8 until 2023. The 24-year-old would have to either declare his decision a year ahead of time or purchase the NFL’s remaining supply of officially sanctioned Jackson jerseys.

While wearing No. 8, Jackson can still achieve a lot.

The good news for those who purchased authentic Jackson shirts is that he will not be changing numbers anytime soon. The good news is that he still has a lot of goals he wants to achieve while wearing No. 8.

Jackson’s main aim is to lead the Ravens to their third Super Bowl championship. He could be considered a contender to win his second NFL MVP Award if he has no residual problems from a recent positive COVID-19 test.

If he changes numbers, Jackson told The Lounge that he wants the Ravens to retire Nos. 1 and 8.

“I want to win a Super Bowl with No. 8 on, do as much as I can with No. 8 on, then come back and do the same thing with No. 1 on,” Jackson said.

The Ravens have not officially retired any numbers as of July 2021. In commemoration of Ed Reed, Ray Lewis, and Jonathan Ogden, the team has not reprinted numbers 20, 52, or 75. Ravens players are also not allowed to wear the number 19 in honor of former Baltimore Colts quarterback Johnny Unitas.

Joe Montana is one of the few famous quarterbacks who has switched numbers several times during his career.

Quarterbacks don’t switch numbers all that frequently. Even after switching teams late in their careers, Peyton Manning and Tom Brady continued to wear Nos. 18 and 12, respectively. Brett Favre, a Green Bay Packers icon, wore No. 4 for the New York Jets and Minnesota Vikings, respectively.

Jackson would not be the first famous quarterback to swap numbers and wear No. 1 if the time comes. With the San Francisco 49ers, Joe Montana wore No. 16 before switching to No. 19 with the Kansas City Chiefs.

Carson Wentz formerly wore No. 11 for the Philadelphia Eagles, but will now wear No. 2 with the Indianapolis Colts. Former colleague Joe Flacco wore No. 5 for his first 13 seasons but is now wearing No. 7 with the Eagles this season.

Kurt Warner, on the other hand, wore No. 10 as a backup quarterback for the St. Louis Rams in 1998. Prior to the 1999 season, he switched to No. 13 and led the Rams to a Super Bowl victory.

Despite this, others, like former Indianapolis Colts general manager Bill Polian, believe Jackson is better suited to play receiver in the NFL. We shouldn’t rule out the possibility of him winning the MVP Award despite wearing two distinct jersey numbers for the same club.

On Facebook, follow Sportscasting. @sportscasting19 is our Twitter handle.

RELATED: Lamar Jackson Adds a Ridiculous Basketball Stunt to His High-Risk Contract Approach

This article broadly covered the following related topics:

  • joe jackson get what you want
  • joe jackson you can t get what you want
  • joe jackson you can’t get what you want
  • joe jackson can’t get what you want
  • you can’t get what you want joe jackson
You May Also Like
Uncategorized

Charles Barkley Delivers a Less-Than-Serious Offer for Bryson DeChambeau Ahead of the Match 4

Bryson DeChambeau may have been one of the breakout stars of the…
Uncategorized

Zach Wilson and New York Jets Suffer Devastating Loss With Tragic Death of Assistant Coach Greg Knapp

What was going through the mind of Zach Wilson when he crashed…
Uncategorized

A 3-Step Plan for the Los Angeles Lakers’ High-Stakes Offseason

With the Los Angeles Lakers likely to be one of the most-watched…
Uncategorized

Former NFL Star Fred Taylor Details How He Nearly Got Scammed Out of $3 Million as a Rookie

When he was a rookie, Fred Taylor says that the NFL told…